No Peek Pork – Country Style Ribs in the Crock Pot

Are you craving a warm meaty meal with lots of flavor?  Our No Peek Pork with Country Style Ribs in the Crock Pot is so delicious! 

The pork is fork tender and the wild rice, cream of mushroom soup and onion soup mix add great flavors to this easy meal.  These are the BEST country style ribs I’ve had!

pork rib covered in rice on a red plate in front of slow cooker full of country ribs

This post is sponsored by Indiana Pork, but all opinions are my own!

Country Style Ribs in the Crock Pot

Tender pork and a creamy gravy that cooks right in with country style ribs makes an easy main dish. Serve with a salad or vegetable for a meal that only takes a few minutes to create.

In the winter we look forward to warm, meaty meals that don’t take much time or effort to prepare.  The ingredients for this easy crock pot meal are easy to keep on hand, country style ribs, a box of wild rice, cream of celery soup, cream of mushroom soup, onion soup mix and water.  I love that no peeking is required.  Just set the crock pot and keep going with your day!

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Country style ribs are one of my favorite cuts of pork!  Our most popular meal is these Slow Cooker BBQ Country Ribs. Another one of our favorite recipes is Slow Cooker Country Style Ribs with Mushroom Gravy.

For a faster cooking method check out our Easy Instant Pot Country Style Ribs.

Tender Slow Cooker Country Style Ribs

This particular cut of pork ribs have a combination of lean meat from the loin and dark meat from the shoulder.  This means that country style ribs are part pork chop and part pulled pork.  Darker meat has a little bit more marbling than lighter colored meat.  Marbling equals flavor!  Country style ribs are also a great value.

Cooking country style ribs using a low and slow method is the best way to tender meat!

I have a No-Peek Chicken recipe that we LOVE!  Any recipe that you make with chicken can also be made with pork…and likely with more flavor!  The marbling in country style ribs is preferred over a chicken breast any day in our house!

Tender Country Style Ribs on a fork above a Crock Pot

When I get a cut of pork that has different colors in different sections I know that I need to cook it with a low and slow cooking method.  The crock pot or slow cooker is a great tool for cooking meat low and slow to make it tender!  Whether you cook on the low setting for 6 to 8 hours or the high setting for 4 to 6 hours the ribs will be tender because the moisture is all contained inside the slow cooker.

If the ribs do not fall off the bone keep cooking until they do!  I have tested this dish on high after 4 hours and it is wonderful!  If my husband is still outside working on the farm, I just stir the rice mixture to prevent burning and turn the crock pot to keep warm.  This meal remains the same quality on keep warm for an hour or two.  That’s a big win in our book!

Pork ribs covered in rice and cream of mushroom soup in a crock pot

The Story Behind Your Rib Dinner

We need meals with this kind of flexibility because we never know when our family will all be together to eat dinner.  We’re also farmers and we share more about our life on the farm here.  We work with our families to help raise pigs and cows as well as corn, soybeans, wheat and hay to feed the animals.

Raising pork is a passion that both sides of our families have carried on for generations.  While taking care of animals has been a long-standing tradition that we were taught as young kids, how we’ve done it has changed over the years.  My husband and I are in our 30s and we both remember our parents building their first climate controlled pig barns in the mid to late 1990s.

On a bone-chilling cold day in the midwest, we appreciate the warmth that our furnace provides inside our house.  The same is true for pigs.  Modern climate-controlled barns have furnaces and specialized systems that control the temperature to keep pigs warm all winter and cool in the summer.  There are actually people all over the country that just think about how to best design barns in different climates to solve problems for pigs and decrease stress as much as possible.  The more stress that we can remove from a pig’s environment the better they will grow.

We eat the meat that we raise here on the farm, but we also buy meat at the grocery store when we want something that we may not have on hand.  I’ve had the opportunity to meet several farmers across the country and I respect the work that they do and the way they go about it.  The National Pork Board and Indiana Pork are strong supporters of the We Care Program.  I know that we are supporting other farm families like our own when we buy food at the grocery store!

Collage of No Peek Pork with Country Style Ribs in the slow cooker with wild rice, cream of mushroom soup, cream of celery soup and onion soup mix.

How to Make Boneless Country Style Ribs

  1. Mix all ingredients except pork
  2. Coat crock well with non-stick cooking spray or use a liner
  3. Pour mixed ingredients into crock
  4. Nestle country style ribs into soup and rice mixture in a single layer
  5. Cook on low 6-8 hours or on high 4-6 hours
  6. Pork should be fork tender & fall off the bone when done

Tips for Making No Peek Pork with Country Style Ribs in the Crock Pot

  • We prefer boneless ribs, but bone-in will work too – just be aware when serving
  • Coat crock well with nonstick cooking spray or use crock pot liners
  • Mix up all ingredients except pork in a separate bowl and pour into crock pot
  • Nestle pork in the rice mixture
  • Keep pork ribs in a single layer for this recipe
  • Do not trim any fat before cooking, it will add flavor as the pork cooks
  • Don’t peek until minimum cooking time is complete
  • If the ribs don’t fall off the bone then continue to cook until they do
  • We like to serve this meal with a salad and a bag of steamable vegetables

More Easy Crock Pot Recipes

Printable No Peek Pork – Country Style Ribs in the Crock Pot Recipe

Country style rib covered in rice on a red plate

No Peek Pork – Country Style Ribs in the Crock Pot

Servings 4 people
Author: Jennifer
Are you craving a warm meaty meal with lots of flavor?  Our No Peek Pork with Country Style Ribs in the Crock Pot is so delicious!  The pork is fork tender and the wild rice and onion soup mix add great flavors to this easy meal.  These are the BEST country style ribs I’ve had! #crockpot #easymeal
4.43 from 7 votes
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours 10 minutes

Ingredients
  

  • 3 country style pork ribs
  • 1 can cream of celery soup
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1 packet onion soup mix
  • 1 box wild rice with seasonings we prefer Uncle Ben’s
  • 1 soup can water

Instructions
 

  • Mix all ingredients except pork together in a separate bowl.  
  • Coat crock pot well with non-stick cooking spray or use a liner.  Pour mixed ingredients into crock
  • Nestle country style ribs into soup and rice mixture in a single layer.
  • Cook on low for 6 to 8 hours or cook on high for 4 to 6 hours.  Pork should be fork tender and fall off the bone when done.

Notes

  • We prefer boneless ribs, but bone-in will work too – just be aware when serving
  • Coat crock well with nonstick cooking spray or use crock pot liners
  • Mix up all ingredients except pork in a separate bowl and pour into crock pot
  • Nestle pork in the rice mixture
  • Keep pork ribs in a single layer for this recipe
  • Do not trim any fat before cooking, it will add flavor as the pork cooks
  • Don’t peek until minimum cooking time is complete
  • If the ribs don’t fall off the bone then continue to cook until they do
  • We like to serve this meal with a salad and a bag of steamable vegetables

Nutrition

Calories: 133kcalCarbohydrates: 16gProtein: 5gFat: 5gSaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 13mgSodium: 1738mgPotassium: 243mgFiber: 1gSugar: 2gVitamin A: 215IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 42mgIron: 1mg

Nutritional Disclaimer

“Plowing Through Life” is not a dietitian or nutrition professional. Any nutritional information shared is an estimate and can vary greatly depending on specific products are used. If calorie count and other nutritional values are important to you, we recommend running the ingredients through an online nutritional calculator of your choice.

Tried this recipe?Mention @PlowingThroughLife or tag #PlowingThroughLife!
  • Collage of easy country style pork ribs in the crock pot including ingredients and steps to make the recipe

12 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    Country ribs are a favorite of mine. I buy them all the time. This recipe looks like a winner. I’m excited to try it.

  2. 5 stars
    I’m planning to make this soon!! So hungry just looking at your country style ribs in the crockpot.

  3. 5 stars
    These look so amazing I went and started the recipe for our dinner tonight! They already smell so wonderful and I especially loved how easy they were!

  4. 5 stars
    This looks SO yummy!! Can’t wait to give it a try!

  5. Christina says:

    Doing low carb at the mo and wondering how cauliflower rice will work as a substitute for regular rice, as long as it’s thawed when I put it in the crock. Has anyone tried this? Thanks and thanks for the recipe. Looks great!

    1. Just a thought to respond to your question. It is really hard to find a slow cooker recipe that includes any kind of rice at all. My suspicion is that rice in general doesn’t hold up well to being cooked this long.

      I would think that it would be even worse with cauliflower…

      I would cook the cauliflower separately, then put the pork on top of it once done.

      This website has another recipe for pork with mushroom (no rice) that might work better for you.

  6. 1 star
    I tried this recipe yesterday. Unfortunately, as I suspected the recipe was incorrect and it didn’t turn out well at all. The meat was not “fall off the bone”. And the rice never cooked, even after 8 hours.

    Please correct this recipe by including precise measurements.
    Like “How big of a box of rice”
    How many pounds of pork”
    I noticed that at least one of your other recipes had more precise directions/measurements

    Will you have the courage to publish my comments now?

    1. Jennifer @ Plowing Through Life says:

      Hey There! I’m sorry this recipe was not a good experience for you! I think it was one of the first ones that I created to share and hopefully I’ve learned to be more specific in the meantime.

      For me it’s been more about trying to keep up with my job and other responsibilities. About the comments – I try really hard to keep it positive here on the site. I’m glad to share constructive comments and hope to be able to improve this recipe as time allows.

      Best Regards, Jennifer

  7. I can certainly understand that people have busy lives.

    Again, to be clear, for the rice, perhaps precise measurements would look like “how many cups”.
    And perhaps include substitutes for the wild rice. Not your fault, I what I bought, we just didn’t care for.

    I ended up using about a pound of rice, which I knew was too much, but it was the smallest container (not a box) I could find. I added a significant amount of fluid to make the rice cook. Still wasn’t enough, as one pound has 10 servings.

    I live in Northern California, and finding just plain wild rice was not possible; Uncle Ben’s or otherwise. I purchased a mix of wild rice and brown rice and some other ingredients. But, it was the wild rice that was still crunchy after cooking on low for 8 hours.

    When I was a kid my Mom used to make a casserole with Cream of Mushroom soup and pork chops and rice. But it was baked. I was happy when I found your recipe for a crock pot as I have been looking for a long time and couldn’t find any before yours..

    My suspicion is that rice and crock pots don’t go well together. I thought, “well, maybe with wild rice” since that normally takes much longer to cook…

    The other issue of the pork not being tender, was surprising to me. I use the crock pot to make pork chops all the time and they are “fall off the bone”. To be fair, the ribs were on sale, and maybe not the best cut.

    Thanks for responding. I appreciate it!

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